Final project: A good README is more important than a pristine codebase

Your README.md is where you flex your technical guns.

Recruiters (usually) aren’t coders. They hand your resume to an engineer to approve or reject for an interview. The difficult part here is that engineering time is extremely valuable. Make it as easy as possible to see your best code. Don’t make the engineer navigate through app/frontend/components/profile/userprofile.jsx:line 147 to see a code sample. Put any clever database schema decisions in your readme, add snippets of fancy queries to your readme, add code samples you’re proud of to your readme.

This highlights your best code. Having seen some code snippets, an engineer is far less likely to browse your repository and stumble on your garbage code. Note: go refactor your garbage code.

Continue reading Final project: A good README is more important than a pristine codebase

Choosing a final project that stands out

You’ve had an idea in your head ever since you enrolled at ${bootcampName}. And now that you’ve completed most of the curriculum, you also have the skills needed to execute. Your bootcamp is giving you two weeks to build a full stack website and it seems like the perfect time to implement your idea and change the world, right?

Hang on. Now is not the time – although your project might be the next decacorn, you’re looking for something more short-term. Although your idea could hit the front page of TechCrunch and gain five million users during your final weeks of bootcamp. it’s more likely you will have only a few users – a ‘login as guest’ account and any other fake personalities you seeded your database with.

A company will spend less than a minute playing with your app. It’s your job to ensure they see the best demonstration of your abilities within that first minute.

Continue reading Choosing a final project that stands out