Your progress will stall after the bootcamp

The value of your bootcamp came in its carefully curated curriculum. Instructors spend hours planning every aspect of the course: deliberating why webpack is easier to setup and understand than gulp, choosing the handful of node modules and ruby gems you’ll need, teaching a database that plays well with the data you’ll be storing.

As a result, you spend very little time on configuration and dedicate all of your precious time to creating. You can still namedrop webpack and babel and es-2015-presets, but a few months later when you decide to start a new project from scratch, you realize you have no idea where to begin (unless you choose your bootcamp’s MERN stack again).

Continue reading Your progress will stall after the bootcamp

You’ve got the job – now what?

You’ve spent the past 4 – 6 months studying a very carefully curated curriculum: first you learned how to ‘hello world’ in Ruby, then you learned how to template that message in Rails, finally you learned how to make the letters change colors when you clicked on them using JavaScript.

You’ve learned so much in the past few months that you’ve managed to trick a company into paying you a crazy amount of money each week because they believe you can take their product to the next level.

You show up on day 1, go through a brief orientation, and install Atom. Now what? You’ve only ever worked on small codebases where you were intimately familiar with every line of code. Your new company’s project is thousands of times bigger and growing each day. It feels like a new pull request is merged into the repository every time you reload the page. How are you going to become familiar with something this fluid?

Continue reading You’ve got the job – now what?

Bridging the gap of CS skills as a bootcamp grad

If you ask hiring managers why they refuse to interview bootcamp grads, they’ll say “computer science fundamentals like data structures and algorithms.” If you ask them what else, they’ll stumble around for words and say something like “four years of immersion.”

It’s not feasible to self-study four years of unrelated coursework and heavy drinking, but it’s not impossible to supplement your bootcamp education with a very strong understanding of computer science fundamentals.

Continue reading Bridging the gap of CS skills as a bootcamp grad